Question: How Long Does An Indictment Trial Take?

Does indictment mean jail time?

Indicted means that formal charges have been filed and the court process will begin.

On such a serious charge (minimum 10 years in prison if convicted) I would assume you already have a lawyer..

What is the next step after an indictment?

After a grand jury indictment, a defendant has the opportunity to enter a plea. A guilty plea could lead to a quick sentencing hearing or the imposition of a pre-arranged plea bargain with prosecutors. If a defendant pleads not guilty, the case will move forward to trial.

What happens if you go to trial and lose?

Your lawyer can tell you what to expect in the event you lose your case based on his experience with that judge and that judge’s reputation. … These judges usually do everything they can to get rid of the case prior to trial. So, if you make them go to trial, and you lose, you might pay the price.

What happens if you are not indicted?

If the grand jury decides not to indict, it returns a “no bill.” However, even if a grand jury doesn’t indict, the prosecutor can return to the same grand jury and present additional evidence, get a new grand jury, or even file criminal charges regardless.

What level of proof is required for an indictment?

The judge must then decide from the preponderance of the evidence whether to grant immunity. This is a far lower burden than “beyond a reasonable doubt,” the threshold a prosecutor must meet at any proceeding criminal trial, but higher than the “probable cause” threshold generally required for indictment.

How long does it take to go to trial after an indictment?

By Federal law, once an indictment is filed and the defendant is aware of it, the case must proceed to trial within 70 days.

How serious is an indictment?

A federal criminal indictment is a serious matter, because it means that the criminal investigation has progressed to a point where the prosecutor now believes that he or she has enough evidence to convict.

What happens if you plead not guilty but are found guilty?

The defendant can change their plea from not guilty to guilty at any time. If the defendant decides to plead guilty before the trial, you won’t be required to give evidence in court. … If the defendant pleads guilty or is found guilty after the trial, they will be sentenced by the court.

Why do cases take so long to go to trial?

The more complicated cases take longer to prepare for trial. The number of parties and issues involved also affect the length of litigation. Virtually all lawyers handle many cases at the same time and thus the schedules of the various lawyers involved play a role in the time it takes for a case to get to trial.

Can you beat an indictment?

That means that a judge cannot simply overturn the decision of the grand jurors who authorized the indictment. It is the constitutional task of the grand jurors to deliberate and decide on whom to charge.

How long does a trial take?

A trial can last up to several weeks, but most straightforward cases will conclude within a few days. In a typical trial, lawyers on both sides will present their argument with supportive evidence and question witnesses.

Does indictment mean trial?

What Happens After Indictment? After you’re indicted, then you’ll go to trial. Getting to trial, however, isn’t as cut and dry as it’s portrayed on television.

Do you go to jail immediately after sentencing?

What Happens at Sentencing? A defendant who has been given a sentence of jail time often wonders whether or not they will be taken to jail immediately. … So, in short: yes, someone may go to jail immediately after sentencing, possibly until their trial.

Can charges be dropped after indictment?

Besides being responsible for deciding whether or not to press charges against a suspect, the prosecution can decide to drop charges any time after criminal proceedings have commenced.

What is the difference between being charged and being indicted?

The difference between being indicted and charged relies on who files the charges. “Being charged” with a crime means the prosecutor filed charges. An indictment means the grand jury filed charges against the defendant.

Can you get bailed out of jail after sentencing?

Some defendants can stay out on bail even after they’ve been convicted. People who have been accused of crime have a general right to bail pending trial. … In some instances, defendants can get out on bail even after they’ve been convicted and sentenced, while they appeal their convictions.

How do you convince a judge to not go to jail?

Tips for Speaking in Front of the JudgeBe yourself. Well, at least be the best version of yourself. … Do not lie, minimize your actions, or make excuses. … Keep your emotions in check. … The judge may ask you when you last used alcohol or drugs. … Be consistent. … The judge may ream you out.

What happens at an indictment hearing?

When a person is indicted, he is given formal notice that it is believed that he committed a crime. … The grand jury listens to the prosecutor and witnesses, and then votes in secret on whether they believe that enough evidence exists to charge the person with a crime.

Can you be indicted without knowing?

Finally, and unfortunately, you may have already been charged with a crime and not know it. Federal prosecutors can ask a grand jury to indict you, and then ask a court to seal that indictment. If that happens, you could walk around for days or weeks or months having been charged and not even know it.

Can a case be dropped before trial?

In fact, criminal charges are dropped before a case reaches the court far more often than most people realize. … While only the prosecution can move to have charges dropped, there are certain circumstances surrounding a case that will increase the chance that they will do so.

Are indictments public?

None of the grand jury proceedings are public. On rare occasions a federal criminal complaint can be filed directly by a U.S. Attorney, usually when the person being charged waives their right to have the case handled by a grand jury. A complaint like this filed directly by a U.S. Attorney is called an “information.”